C*H*A*N*R*O*E*U*N

Food for Thought, Thought for Action!


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Strategy of Giving

យុទ្ធសាស្រ្តនៃការផ្តល់អោយ

Web brought us “FREE”.

“Free” gives companies an easy connection with their audiences. But to understand free we have to understand the essence of giving.  And to make business out of giving takes an understanding of giving as a strategic tool.

The Strategy of Giving is a brilliantly simple theory that explains why companies need to give more to get more. The theory is packed in an easy-to-read format with informative graphics. SoG takes only an hour to read and two hours to master.

Strategy of Giving

The original post in www.chantra.info

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Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction

A small book, Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction by Damien Keown is a very informative book about Buddhism. The more I read this book, the more I don’t know about Buddhism though I am a Buddhist. The book presents us about Buddhism in a simple, clear, concise, accurate, and (usually) respectful way. It briefly covers the historical Buddha, the development and foundations of the different major branches, and the major themes, beliefs, and ideas.

People are always asking me for a book that “explains Buddhism”. Therefore, this book would be the recommended one for both Buddhists and the people who are interested in searching about Buddhism.


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Understanding Trauma in Cambodia


2nd Edition of Understanding Trauma in Cambodia Handbook, produced by CSD, freely given to Cambodians. For non-Cambodians interested in receiving a copy, we suggest a donation of US$40 (proceeds go toward further printing costs). Alternatively, please feel free to reproduce this Handbook, wholly attached as PDF, for usage. Download 95MB

Source and Thanks to Centre for Social Development (CSDCambodia)


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Electronic Chuon Nath Khmer Dictionary

Download Dictionary ដោនឡូត​ (32MB, RAR format)

Download Win RAR (1.7MB)

Installation Hints:

1. Download the Electronic Choun Nath Khmer Dictionary

2. Download Win RAR (if your computer does not have it)

3. Install Win RAR

4. Open the Electronic Choun Nath Khmer Dictionary File

5. Install Khmer Unicode (if your computer does not have it)

6. Install the Electronic Choun Nath Khmer Dictionary

Description

In 1938, the Buddhist Institute (BI) published the first Khmer dictionary in 2 volumes. The 1858-page dictionary was written by Samdech Sangh Chuon Nath, the Supreme Patriarch of the Buddhist Mohaniakaya sect. The National Committee of the Khmer Language, under the direction of Sok An, decided to use this dictionary exclusively as its reference in terms of spelling.

The fifth edition of the dictionary is now available in electronic format, under an initiative of the BI and the Sealang Projects. The electronic dictionary is distributed free of charge. Numerous Cambodians, including journalists and students, make spelling errors. This dictionary will be very useful for them. One can refer to it or check the meaning of a word or its spelling with just a simple click.



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ឯកសារល្អៗពីមជ្ឈមណ្ឌលឯកសារកម្ពុជា Good Publications from the Documation Centre of Cambodia

ខាងក្រោមនេះគឺជាសៀវភៅមួយចំនួនដែលបានបោះពុម្ពផ្សាយដោយមជ្ឈមណ្ឌលឯកសារកម្ពុជា។ វាមានសារៈណាស់សំរាប់​កូនខ្មែរដែលត្រូវតែសិក្សាស្វែងយល់ពីប្រវត្តិសាស្រ្តរបស់ខ្លួនពីព្រោះវាប្រវត្តិសាស្ត្រ​គឺជាកញ្ចក់ដែលបង្ហាញយើងពីមេរៀនជីវិត។​ ធ្វើជាមនុស្សត្រូវតែរៀនពីអតីតកាល ធ្វើនៅពេលបច្ចុប្បន្ន និងមានគំរោងសំរាប់អនាគត។

ប្រវត្តិសាស្រ្តកម្ពុជាប្រជាធិបតេយ្យ

A History of Democratic Kampuchea (1975-1979)5-1979)

Khamboly Dy

2007

73 pages in English. 100 pages in Khmer

ថតទុក Download (PDF 1 (Eng) PDF 1 (Kh) PDF 2 (Eng) PDF 2 (Kh)

Foreword

Chinese diplomat Chou Ta-kuan gave the world his account of life at Angkor Wat eight hundred years ago. Since that time, others have been writing our history for us. Countless scholars have examined our most prized cultural treasure and more recently, the Cambodian genocide of 1975-1979. But with Khamboly Dy’s A History of Democratic Kampuchea, Cambodians are at last beginning to investigate and record their country’s past. This new volume represents two years of research and marks the first such text written by a Cambodian.

Writing about this bleak period of history for a new generation may run the risk of re-opening old wounds for the survivors of Democratic Kampuchea. Many Cambodians have tried to put their memories of the regime behind them and move on. But we cannot progress — much less reconcile with ourselves and others — until we have confronted the past and understand both what happened and why it happened. Only with this understanding can we truly begin to heal.

Intended for high school students, this book is equally relevant for adults. All of us can draw lessons from our history. By facing this dark period of our past, we can learn from it and move toward becoming a nation of people who are invested in preventing future occurrences of genocide, both at home and in the myriad countries that are today facing massive human rights abuses. And by taking responsibility for teaching our children through texts such as this one, Cambodia can go forward and mold future generations who work to ensure that the seeds of genocide never again take root in our country.

Youk Chhang

Director

Documentation Center of Cambodia

The text was submitted to the Government Working Commission to Review the Draft of the History of Democratic Kampuchea. On January 3, 2007, the Commission decided that, “the text can be used as a supplementary discussion material (for teachers) and as base to write a history lesson for (high school) students. Funding for this project was generously provided by the Soros Foundation’s Open Society Institute (OSI) and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Support for DC-Cam’s operations is provided by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (Sida).

Buddhism under Pol Pot

Ian Harris

2007

304 pages in English

ថតទុក Download PDF1 PDF2 PDF3 PDF4

This new book by Ian Harris, Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Cumbria, UK, explores the fate of Buddhism before, during, and shortly after Democratic Kampuchea. Prum Phalla of the Documentation Center of Cambodia provided research assistance on this project. Dr. Harris begins with an examination of Buddhism under Sihanouk and Lon Nol, and then traces the origins of Khmer Communism and its relationship with Buddhism in Cambodia. He then looks at the fate of Buddhism early in the regime, including monk evacuations and flights abroad, defrocking, forced marriage, military service, and executions. The practice of Buddhism during the regime is also examined, including Buddhist rites and the fate of pagodas, images, and religious texts. Dr. Harris weighs the claims of monk deaths and pagodas destroyed during Democratic Kampuchea against his findings from extensive interviews and documentary research. He concludes that there was no policy for the systematic liquidation of monks in Democratic Kampuchea. Ian Harris and Prum Phalla: Ian Harris is Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Cumbria, UK and Tung Lin Kok Yuen, Visiting Professor on Buddhism and Contemporary Society at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Co-founder of the UK Association for Buddhist Studies (UKABS) and author of many works on Buddhist ethics and politics, his previous book was Cambodian Buddhism: History and Practice (2005). He is currently investigating the links between Buddhism and politics in pre-Pol Pot Cambodia.

Victims and Perpetrators:
The Testimony of Young Khmer Rouge Cadres at S-21

Meng-Try Ea and Sorya Sim

2001

76 pages in English, 150 pages in Khmer

ថតទុក Download (PDF)

In Democratic Kampuchea’s Region 31, the Khmer Rouge recruited children to serve as guards, “catchers,” and animal husbandry workers in Tuol Sleng Prison (S-21). This monograph explores how these and other Cambodian youth were forced to become Khmer Rouge cadres, how they were indoctrinated in the ideology of Democratic Kampuchea, how they were affected, and the violation of their rights.

The authors used Khmer Rouge biographies and interviews with 73 people to collect information on these youths. Eighteen of those interviewed were Khmer Rouge cadres at S-21, 22 are family members of deceased S-21 cadres, and 33 are survivors of the regime. The authors conclude that these children were victims as well as perpetrators. Funding provided by the Human Rights Project Funds of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the United Kingdom through the British Embassy, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and the Government of Norway.

Oukoubah:
Genocide Justice for the Cham Muslims under Democratic Kampuchea

Osman Ysa

2002

140 in English, 205 pages in Khmer

ថតទុក Download (PDF)

This monograph explores the genocide of the Cham ethnic group, making a case that the Cham, who are Muslims, were killed a rate that was nearly double to triple that of the general Cambodian population during the Democratic Kampuchea regime. It provides evidence showing that the Cham comprised 10% of Cambodia’s population prior to 1975 (about 700,000 people), but numbered only 200,000 after the regime fell in 1979.

The Khmer Rouge Division 703: From Victory to Self-Destruction

Vannak Huy

2003

202 pages in English, 250 in Khmer

ថតទុក Download (PDF)

One of the most favored of the Khmer Rouge’s nine military divisions, Division 703 was composed of 5,000 to 6,000 peasants, primarily from Kandal province. At the end of 1975, its soldiers with “clean” backgrounds were given positions at Tuol Sleng (the central-level prison also known as S-21) or its branch office S-21D (Prey Sar prison) and various government offices. At least 567 of these men were later branded as “enemies” of the regime and executed at S-21.

This monograph examines the careers of 40 soldiers who worked in Division 703. Most of those who survived the 1979 defeat of the Khmer Rouge returned to their villages in the early 1980s, often after spending time in prison as a result of their involvement with the regime. Funding provided by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.

Seven Candidates for Prosecution: Accountability for the Crimes of the Khmer Rouge

Stephen Heder and Brian Tittemore

2004

153 pages in English (executive summary in Khmer)

247 pages in Japanese Language

ថតទុក Download (PDF)

One of the most favored of the Khmer Rouge’s nine military divisions, Division 703 was composed of 5,000 to 6,000 peasants, primarily from Kandal province. At the end of 1975, its soldiers with “clean” backgrounds were given positions at Tuol Sleng (the central-level prison also known as S-21) or its branch office S-21D (Prey Sar prison) and various government offices. At least 567 of these men were later branded as “enemies” of the regime and executed at S-21.

This monograph examines the careers of 40 soldiers who worked in Division 703. Most of those who survived the 1979 defeat of the Khmer Rouge returned to their villages in the early 1980s, often after spending time in prison as a result of their involvement with the regime. Funding provided by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.